QQ: Can I Use Niacinamide to Help Treat My Acne? | kzfbfkttn.com

QQ: Can I Use Niacinamide to Help Treat My Acne?

Niacinamide (also known as vitamin B3) is among the most popular skincare ingredients, often deemed “essential” in TikTok skincare routines. And for good reason: The brightener can help banish dark spots and redness while reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.1

But is the sought-after ingredient good for acne? We asked board-certified dermatologists Marisa Garshick, MD, and Jessie Cheung, MD, to give us the scoop on niacinamide for acne. Read their thoughts below.

MEET THE EXPERT

  • Marisa Garshick, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist based in New York and New Jersey. 
  • Jessie Cheung, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist based in Illinois and New York.

What Is Niacinamide?

Niacinamide, also known as vitamin B3, is a water-soluble vitamin with many different benefits for the skin,” explains Garshick. “Niacinamide has become more popular as it is a versatile ingredient that’s a great option on its own to help target skincare concerns such as discoloration and redness while being gentle on the skin.”

The ingredient boosts ceramide production in the skin; this is crucial for maintaining barrier function. This barrier helps keep the skin hydrated and protected from environmental stressors like pollution and UV radiation. Furthermore, niacinamide possesses anti-inflammatory properties that aid in soothing skin redness and irritation.2

Does It Work for Acne?

Yes, niacinamide can help with acne, Cheung tells us. “Niacinamide will treat acne and balance oil production while also shrinking the appearance of pores,” she explains. Adds Garshick: “Niacinamide can help to even skin tone and improve the appearance of hyperpigmentation and dark spots.”

Adding It to Your Routine

If you’re considering incorporating niacinamide into your skincare routine, there are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind. Here are some tips to help you get started:

  • Patch test: Before using any new product or ingredient, it’s always a good idea to patch (as in test it on a small area of your skin) first. This will help you determine if you have any adverse reactions or allergies to niacinamide.
  • Start small: Cheung recommends starting with a lower concentration in case your skin is sensitive to niacinamide. “It’s safest to look for concentrations from 2-5%, and even up to 10% if your skin tolerates it,” she explains. 
  • Choose the right product: Niacinamide is in various skincare products, including serums, moisturizers, toners, and even spot treatments. Consider your skin type and specific concerns when selecting the most suitable formulation.
  • Don’t overdo it: More is not always better. Using excessive amounts of niacinamide won’t necessarily provide faster or better results. Stick to the recommended usage and allow the ingredient time to work magic.
  • Be patient: Like any skincare ingredient, results may not be immediate. Give yourself time to notice any changes in your skin, as effects can vary depending on individual factors. Consistency is key.

When it comes to products, Garshick has a few favorites. “The TruSkin Niacinamide Serum ($16) works to improve discoloration without irritating the skin. It won’t leave [it] feeling greasy,” she tells us. “MaeLove’s NIA 10 Serum ($32)  is especially great for those with sensitive, inflamed, dry, or acne-prone skin. This calming serum contains niacinamide (vitamin B3), zinc, and white tea extract, helping to reduce redness and soothe the skin.” Chenug likes ISDIN’s Melaclear Advanced ($175), which “combines niacinamide with tranexamic acid and licorice root extract to treat unwanted dark spots, including melasma.”

Potential Side Effects and Precautions

Be mindful of the other ingredients in your routine before adding niacinamide into the mix. “Avoid applying niacinamide at the same time as AHAs or BHAs, as the high pH of niacinamide will affect the absorption of those acids,” Cheung says. That said, there are plenty of ingredients niacinamide plays with nicely. “It may be paired with ingredients such as kojic acid, arbutin, or tranexamic acid to help with pigmentation or other ingredients commonly found in moisturizers such as ceramides and hyaluronic acid,” Garshick tells us.

As mentioned above, niacinamide at higher concentrations may lead to sensitivity or irritation.

The Final Takeaway

Niacinamide is a form of vitamin B3 with many benefits for the skin, including helping to reduce the appearance of acne and acne scarring. If you’re looking for a simple way to improve the health and appearance of your acne-prone skin, consider incorporating niacinamide into your daily regimen. With its potent blend of brightening and protective properties, this well-rounded ingredient is a valuable addition to many routines.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Discover

Sponsor

spot_imgspot_img

Latest

Zendaya’s ‘Challengers’ Outfits Are Peak Tennis Style: 7 Standout Looks to Try

The past few months have proved that Zendaya loves a method dressing moment. The fashion icon just wrapped her Dune: Part Two press tour, wearing an array of...

Deinde’s Biotech-Driven Products Usher in a New Era of Anti-Aging Skincare

The skincare industry is booming, offering fresh approaches to common concerns as well as drawing in new generations focused on the health and improvement...

These 8 Princess Diana-Loved Handbags Are a Shortcut to Royal-Approved Style

If we had to choose our favorite style icon of all time, it would without a doubt have to be the late Princess Diana. She wasn’t afraid...

The 11 Best Drugstore Tinted Moisturizers That Rival (and Sometimes Beat Out) High-End Brands

TL;DR Our favorite drugstore tinted moisturizer is the ColourPop Pretty Fresh Hyaluronic Acid Tinted Moisturizer, thanks to its extensive shade range and natural-looking coverage that’s easy...

Why Your Hair Takes So Long to Dry—and How to Speed Up the Process

Washing your hair is considerably more daunting when you know you'll have to spend a chunk of time waiting for it to dry. If...